Fishmonger, Crater, Aden

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On Writing and Resolutions

For too long, this site has been dormant. In the spirit of the start of a new year, I’ve opted to resolve to post here more often, ideally once a week, barring situations that may make me right more (interesting visits somewhere) or less (some sort of outbreak of massive Yemen related news or another #Barrymoregate-esque brush with unintentional viral stardom). If the past is any indication, I’ll aim to keep things eclectic; I’ve previously used this space to do everything from comment on Al Qaeda leader’s sartorial choices, discuss the surprising ubiquity random KPOP singles, expound on the importance of facial hair, and contextualize media frenzies, in addition to posting photos and aggregating my recent writings. I’ll refrain from setting any real limits or making any firm predictions on where things may lead: if the time since I unfortunately inadvertently set this space aside is any indication, things are likely to take a series of twists and turns. Either way, I’ll aim to use it as a place to post writings and reflections that don’t fit into my usual platforms (in addition to, hopefully, using it as a means of facilitating my long ruminated aim to begin reviewing the burgeoning number of Yemeni restaurants popping up around the world). Here’s hoping what I write will be of use to readers on some level–or, at the very least, make for somewhat interesting reading.

The Other Side

There are plenty of American Journalists living in and writing about the Arab World; for various reasons, there are comparatively few Arab journalists living in and writing about the United States. A year ago, my friend Khalid Abdulhadi traveled to the United States in a trip organized by the State Department’s International Visitors Program. Here the English version of an article he wrote for al-Masdar; original Arabic article can be read here

America is split, tightening its belt 

There will  be no better  ideal opportunity to see  Americans normally  behave   than to visit  a bustling city, such as San Francisco, which I actually did late last October. At that particular time, the US presidential   campaign was nearing its climax just one week ahead of Election Day, as the San Francisco Giants team won the World baseball championship, which was coupled with the advent of the Halloween festival.   

The US, which is the world’s economic superpower, receives its visitors with an official caution and yawning atmosphere as if it acquiesced to economic concerns after it had renounced its costly pride.

Washington Dulles airport , which receives the bulk  of travelers coming  to the US capital through Europe, features America’ fear of any visiting foreigner. Visitors usually stand in long lines, waiting for drastic security checks and/ or huge police dogs appallingly and zealously scrutinizing all new comers in what can be described as the most noticeable psychological legacy from the 9/11 terrorist attacks.  Autumn has strewn about cherry leaves along Washington pavements surrounded by landmarks tinged with French taste and Greek-like design. A combination of scenes spurs visitors to think  that the superpower that grapples with an economic crisis is to going to see another autumn visiting exhausted empires.

Furthermore, myriad renovations are simply and austerely carried out on Washington streets and buildings as the Japanese and European-made vehicles dominate vehicle lines in all US cities. It is here in America that gleaners of paradoxes can pinpoint  many signs of austerity in the largest country of Capitalism and the guardian of its values.

Though the third debate that took place  on October 23 between the Democratic presidential candidate, Barack Obama, and his Republican challenger, Mitt Romney, was allocated  for the discussion of the US foreign policy, both nominees tended a little bit to deliberate upon  economic issues that have been of key concern for Americans since the global economic crisis erupted.

“One of the challenges that have faced us over the recent years  in the countries we governed (Iraq and Afghanistan) is that we tried to build up such countries while neglecting our economy, education and energy. We cannot give lessons to the world without applying same in our country,”  said Obama.

Responding to Romney, who pushed for an increase in defense spending, and criticized his rival’s military policies by accusing  him of stinting military spending and of weakening the US influence across the world, Obama said, “The world needs a strong America. therefore, it is important to rebuild America. My plan is this: let us first bring industrial jobs into our country. This is actually what I have done when I subsidized automakers. We should also do our best to create job opportunities for tomorrow , mainly in the field of energy”.

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